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June 2011

Nestle Purina Recalls Purina Cat Chow Naturals & Friskies Grillers Blend Dry Cat Food In CO, ID & OR

ST. LOUIS, June 27, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Nestle Purina PetCare Company (NPPC) is voluntarily recalling approximately 870 bags of dry cat food shipped to Colorado, Idaho and Oregon.  This is being done as a precautionary measure, as the product has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.  Only the following products with both the "Best By" date and production codes shown are included in this voluntary recall:

Product Name

Bag Size

"Best By" Date & Production Code*

Bag UPC Code

 




 

Cat Chow Naturals Dry Cat Food

6.3 lb.

AUG 2012  10331083 13

17800  11320

 




 

Friskies Grillers Blend Dry Cat Food

3.15 lb.

AUG 2012  10381083  06

50000  08450

 




 

Friskies Grillers Blend Dry Cat Food

16 lb.

AUG 2012  10381083  06

50000  57578

 




 

* "Best By" Date and Production Code is found on the back or bottom of the bag.

 
       


The bags of dry cat food in this recall were distributed in error in February, 2011 to a small number of customers in Colorado, Idaho and Oregon, which may have further distributed the product to other Western states.   There have been no consumer complaints and no reports of illness.

No additional Purina cat or dog products are involved.  Only products which match the "Best By" date and production codes above are involved.  

Consumers who have purchased any of these dry cat food products with these "Best By" Dates and Production Codes should discard it.  

Salmonella can affect animals eating the product and there is a risk to humans from handling contaminated products.  People handling contaminated dry pet food can become infected with Salmonella, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with surfaces exposed to this product.  Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for the following symptoms:  nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.  Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms.  Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may exhibit decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain.  If left untreated, pets may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting.  Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans.  If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.  

At Nestle Purina PetCare, the safety and efficacy of our products are our top priority.  We apologize for any inconvenience due to this voluntary recall.  For further information or to obtain a product refund, please call NPPC toll-free at 1-800-982-6559 weekdays 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Central Time, or visit http://www.purina.com/.  

SOURCE Nestle Purina PetCare

Consumer Contact, Nestle Purina PetCare Office of Consumer Affairs, 1-800-982-6559; or media, Jill Winte, +1-314-982-3032


Holistic Tips By Dr Jane Bicks - Focus On Fleas

Last month, we launched a new series about ‘holistic’ health care for companion animals. Remember, holistic care entails viewing the body as a whole as well as how every discrete part works in relation to all the other parts. In keeping with a holistic mindset, this month I want to address fleas. Flea season is, or will very soon be, upon us again and the treatment of fleas illustrates how important the holistic approach is.

If you’ve experienced problems with fleas, or if your dog or cat is itchy, ask the following questions …

Do you live in a warm, humid environment? Or, has it been unusually warm for the past three weeks?

Under warm, humid conditions, a flea can complete its life cycle in only three weeks. Fleas have four life stages: egg, larvae, pupae and adult. Fleas take up residence in carpets and bedding, and when stimulated by vibrations, carbon dioxide or heat, adults hatch and seek out a host in your dog or cat. Upon transferral to your companion animal’s skin and coat, a flea can live for a year or more.

Have you just moved into a new home? Did animals live there before you?

If so, beware! There may be large numbers of flea eggs and larvae lurking in the carpet just waiting to hatch.

Has your companion animal recently started scratching and biting herself, often relentlessly? Does your dog have inflamed sores or evidence of hair loss, usually around the base of tail and lower back? Has your cat recently pulled out small clumps of hair, experienced unexplanable hair loss, or suffer from bumpy scabs, usually in the tummy area?

If the answer to any of these questions is “yes”, your pet is likely suffering from an attack of the fleas. Furthermore, your dear companion may also have a flea allergy, developing hot spots or skin infections as secondary symptoms.

Are there small, black or dark red, dirt-like flecks in the fur, especially along the base of the tail or along the spine?

Commonly called ‘flea dirt’, these specks are tiny clots of digested blood left behind by feeding fleas.

An easy way to find out whether or not your cat has flea dirt is to put him on a light-colored sheet or towel, then rub his fur back-and-forth. If he has fleas, you will see the evidence all around you. Even if you can’t see any fleas (which can be challenging unless the fur is white), the presence of flea dirt tells you without a doubt that you’ve got a flea problem.

There are two golden rules for treating fleas. One is to treat all animals in the household, and the other is treating the environment. Proactive management is vital, and following both options will be far more effective than just following one or the other.

Treating the environment

If you have a heavy infestation, or an animal who is sensitive to flea bites, controlling the flea population in the surrounding environment is crucial. Keep in mind that half of a flea’s life cycle occurs in your carpets, bedding and dust on the floor. An easy way to control fleas is to vacuum at least once a week - you will suck up eggs and immature fleas before they have a chance to hatch into biting adults. You might also consider inserting a flea collar inside your vacuum cleaner, which can be effective at killing fleas post-cleaning. Some pet parents have had good luck using diatomaceous earth (a non-toxic powder composed of ground fossilized organisms), but be sure to read the usage notes carefully as inhalation can prove dangerous. This powder interferes with a flea’s moisture control and causes it to dry out and die. If you like powders, you can also combine powdered eucalyptus, fennel, rosemary, yellow dock, wormwood and rue and apply sparingly to the carpet to repel fleas (for dog-only households, as some herbs can prove quite harmful to cats and other animals).

If you are not a fan of powders and you do not have a cat, try the following essential oil combination: up to 50 drops of lavender and eucalyptus combined with 1 ½ cups of water in a spray bottle. Shake well and mist the carpet just prior to vacuuming. If you have wood floors, try mopping with an emulsion of ½ cup lemon juice, ½ cup olive oil and 30 drops lavender oil (again, for dog-only homes).

There is a “natural” option for flea control outdoors in the form of Nematodes, which are worms that eat only fleas. If none of these steps prove effective, you may require the services of an exterminator. Remember, fleas can carry disease, such as the bubonic plague, so you need to address a serious problem decisively.

Treating the Pet

If the quantity of fleas is limited, you can use a flea comb to remove fleas manually, on a daily basis. Or, one or two drops of essential oil flea repellent massaged into the coat twice a week may be all that is necessary (for dogs, not cats). Try mixing 10 ml grape seed or almond oil with 10 drops lavender and 5 drops cedar wood oils, and use sparingly in your dog’s coat. If your dog has a heavy flea load, you can use the preceding recommendations with the added step of a bath.

Since it is hard to control fleas naturally, especially in cats, I suggest that you consult your veterinarian for product recommendations. Avoid the organophosphate powders and sprays, which are very toxic and not very effective. Some of the OTC commercial insecticide flea powders are potentially very toxic to cats and kittens.

Thank you for all you do to make the world a better place for companion animals,

Dr. Jane Bicks, DVM, product formulator for Life's Abundance products


Men’s Health: Common Issues and Natural Remedies

When it comes to their health, men tend to be more inclined than women to push aside health issues and hope that things will “take care of themselves”. Further, while they may strive to maintain physical health, men may be less likely to manage emotional and mental well-being.

Whether these behaviors are self-induced or subconscious due to societal pressures to be “tough” and “masculine”, health should not be a gender-based issue! Ignoring a nagging health condition or allowing a problem to go undiagnosed can lead to further complications.

Especially for men over 40, regular checkups should be made by an herbalist, homeopathic or general practitioner to evaluate general prostate health, cholesterol and blood pressure levels.

At this time, other health issues can also be mentioned and addressed, such as insomnia, depression, weight gain, etc.

Check out two of the most common internal and external health concerns and tips for natural support below.

Prostate Health

The three main disorders that can affect the prostate gland include: infection, enlarged prostate (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia), and prostate cancer. All three can directly affect the functionality of the penis and lead to erectile dysfunction and low libido.

Since research suggests that diet and stress appear to be the main culprits of prostate disorders, it is very important to follow a healthy nutrition plan and manage tension. Be sure to include a lot of fresh vegetables and fruits into daily diets, as well as fresh fish. Choose whole grains rather than refined white breads, pasta, crackers, and rice. Avoid fattening meats and packaged, processed foods.

Herbal and homeopathic remedies can greatly support prostate health, especially Saw palmetto (Sabal serrulata), which has been studied for its association with promoting male sexual health, and therefore the health of the prostate gland and normal PSA levels.

Hypoxis rooperi (extract of African potato) is a plant containing nutrient values that are as high as and possibly greater than in modern vegetables. Hypoxis rooperi has been researched for its ability to support the health of the prostate gland and testicles.

Hair Loss

Another health issue most men are concerned about is hair loss. Permanent male-pattern baldness typically begins to affect men as early as their teens and early twenties, with visible hair loss or balding appearing first near the top of the head, with a receding hairline at the temples.

While genetics are responsible for most balding, herbal and homeopathic remedies can help to stimulate and encourage hair growth as well as support blood circulation, hormonal balance and thyroid functioning.

Herbs commonly used include Ginkgo biloba, Rosmarinus officinale and Xanthoxylum clavaherculis help to promote strong, abundant hair. Other powerful herbs such as Equisetum arvense, Avena sativa and Echinacea are effective combating hair loss and nourishing hair follicles.

Prostate Dr.™ Promotes prostate gland health, plus urinary tract and immune system functioning

ReGrow Plus™ Promotes circulation to hair follicles and roots for healthy hair


Bravo! Issues Nationwide Recall of Bravo! Pig Ears Dog Chews Because of Possible Salmonella Health Risk

Bravo! Issues Nationwide Recall of Bravo! Pig Ears Dog Chews
Because of Possible Salmonella Health Risk

 

Contact:
David Bogner
Phone: 866.922.9222
www.bravorawdiet.com
1 


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
- June 3, 2011 – Bravo! is voluntarily recalling select boxes of Bravo! Pig Ears Chews because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. The products affected by this recall includes only Bravo! 50 ct bulk Oven roasted Pig Ears Product Code: 75-121 Lot # 12-06-10.

Salmonella can affect animals and there is a risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the chews or any other surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms including, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare provider.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Some pets will have only have decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

The company has received no reports of illness in either people or animals associated with the product. Bravo! is issuing this action out of an abundance of caution and sincerely regrets any inconvenience to pet owners as a result of this announcement.

Bravo! Pig Ears were distributed to retailers on the East and West Coasts. They were shipped to distributors and retailers between January 1 and February 28, 2011, where they were available for purchase.

The recall is the result of routine sampling program by the Washington State Department of Agriculture which revealed that the finished products contained the bacteria. The company has no product left in inventory from this batch of pig ears.

Consumers who have purchased any of these pig ears are urged to return the product to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions about the recall, should visit http://www.bravorawdiet.com/2 or call toll free 1.866.922.9222 9 am to 5 pm Monday to Friday.

From Fda.Gov