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May 2012

Are You Treating Your Dog Or Cat With Empty Calorie Snacks?

Even though we act like it’s true, pets aren’t just like people. Ingesting empty-calorie snacks every once in a while can have a much greater impact on pets than humans, and not in a good way. Even feeding a diet of premium food may not offset the potential damage of ingesting “junk foods”, which often contain unsavory ingredients including artificial flavors and colors. In this particular health equation, it isn’t just a matter of subtraction (or taking away the bad stuff). Thanks to Dr. Jane’s wholesome recipes, you can actually add nutrients to your companion animal’s daily intake. In this episode of Pet Talk, Dr. Sarah reveals how simple it is to make a positive change. If you want to provide your fur kids with the best possible nutritional advantage, you owe it to yourself to watch the latest episode right now.

Watch The Video

 

 

 

Life's Abundance carries an excellent selection of Healthy, Natural Dog and Cat Treats For Your Furbaby!

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The Promise of Probiotics

Kitty

Forty years ago, the famous Australian virologist Sir Macfarlane Burnett said, regarding antibiotics, that “By the late twentieth century, we can anticipate the virtual elimination of infectious diseases as a significant factor in social life.”

Unfortunately, his prediction proved utterly wrong.

In the last couple of decades, we’ve seen the development of superbugs – bacteria that are resistant to a wide range of antibiotics, which has left researchers scrambling for solutions. Even a few years ago, our focus was on the targeted elimination of specific bacteria through the use of antibiotics. In an unforeseen consequence, the prevalent usage of these medications has altered entire bacterial populations. This change represents a paradigm shift in the treatment of both humans and companion animals. Fortunately, there is a tool in our arsenal to help us all lead healthier lives.

Beneficial bacteria known as probiotics help to promote health and fight illness in several ways. They actively block ‘bad’ bacteria from establishing colonies, help maintain a healthy immune system, regulate inflammatory responses and enhance cellular homeostasis (a state of balance in the body).

Probiotics are probably best-known for their promotion of digestive health. However, researchers are finding that their benefits extend beyond the intestinal system. Practically every month, new research is published in medical journals detailing exciting new functions of probiotics.

Take, for example, current research into the application of probiotics in periodontal disease. Advances in probiotic science have given periodontists the ability to employ these friendly bacteria as nano-soldiers in combating plaque. As we all know, plaque hardens into tartar which leads to periodontal disease. Probiotics (L. acidophilus and L. casei) have been proven to inhibit formation of disease-causing plaque by making saliva more acidic. Additionally, we’ve found that probiotics also produce antioxidants, which can help prevent plaque formation by neutralizing the free electrons needed for the mineralization of plaque. When veterinarian scientists applied probiotics below the gum lines of Beagles, they inhibited the growth of bad bacteria, reduced inflammation and improved bone density (Chatterjee et al, 2011). Furthermore, halitosis, more commonly known as ‘doggie breath’, is the odor released by volatile sulphur compounds (VSC), which emanate from ‘bad bacteria’. Probiotics actually minimize bad breath by altering VSCs into gasses required for metabolism (Chatterjee et al, 2011).

Who knew oral hygiene could be so exciting!

In humans, researchers are now studying the effects of probiotics in the treatment of childhood asthma and eczema, two diseases often related to childhood dietary allergies. Lactobacillus rhamnosus is of particular interest in human medicine, as children supplemented with lysed (broken down) L. rhamnosus cells showed a substantial improvement in quality of life, skin symptoms and skin irritation (Hoang et al, 2010). Yu et al (2010) found that oral treatment with L. rhamnosus prior to sensitization can reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in allergic airway inflammation, suggesting that L. rhamnonsus may one day be used for the prevention of asthma. However, these areas require further study to determine the full promise of treatment by probiotics.

But wait, there’s more! Probiotics are currently being studied for potential human treatment in several areas, including dental caries, vaginitis, urogenital infections, irritable bowel disease, cystic fibrosis, Travellers' diarrhea and even various cancers. In the next few years, I believe we will see significant advances in probiotic research that will benefit both humans and companion animals.

Rest assured that all of us here at Life’s Abundance are committed to reviewing and utilizing the best of new scientific research to promote the health of you and your fur kids!

Thank you for all you do to make the world a better place for companion animals.

Dr Jane Bicks Dr. Jane Bicks

References
Chatterjee A, Bhattacharya H, Kandwal A. Probiotics in periodontal health and disease. J Indian Soc Periodontol. 2011 Jan;15(1):23-8.

Hoang BX, Shaw G, Pham P, Levine SA. Lactobacillus rhamnosus cell lysate in the management of resistant childhood atopic eczema. Inflamm Allergy Drug Targets. 2010 Jul 1;9(3):192-6.

Yu J, Jang SO, Kim BJ, Song YH, Kwon JW, Kang MJ, Choi WA, Jung HD, Hong SJ. The Effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on the Prevention of Asthma in a Murine Model. Allergy Asthma Immunol Res. 2010 Jul;2(3):199-205. Epub 2010 Mar 19.

Anna Oksaharju, Matti Kankainen, Riina A Kekkonen, Ken A Lindstedt, Petri T Kovanen, Riitta Korpela, and Minja Miettinen. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus downregulates FCER1andHRH4 expression in human mast cells. World J Gastroenterol. 2011. February 14; 17(6): 750-759.

Elliott DR, Wilson M, Buckley CM, Spratt DA. Cultivable oral microbiota of domestic dogs. J Clin Microbiol.


Wellness Dog Food - Is The Whitefish And Sweet Potato Mix Really Deboned? What About Wellness Cat Food?

I found a very interesting video on YouTube about Wellness. The man shows that Wellness Whitefish and Sweet Potato actually has tons of bones in their food (and some hair). What I found really interesting were many of the comments state he planted the bones. The bag is sealed and he scoops from the top of the bag. He also uses a new scooper so it's not like he's "planting" the food. Also, it does appear this video has been professionally done - really anyone can make a video look good so the people in the comments section just don't know how to use the correct tools. Why would anyone take you serious if it didn't look professional? Plus this man doesn't have a ton of videos out there - just this one. I think he did a great job and this is a serious matter so he put a lot of thought into the video.

He also brings up the point about the cat food and salmon. What about the fish in the Wellness cat food? Do people find bones just like in the dog food and accept it?

Now here's a really good one - The video was shot in 2008. However, I just looked up the ingredients and found that it now states - Whitefish - no longer does it state "Deboned." So my question is, did Wellness change their ingredient label because so many people were complaining about the bones and they figured it if just states "whitefish" people will accept the bones being in there?

Think twice when buying this food. This is just another fast one being pulled on the consumer. As we know Wellness just had a recall but what I find very weird is the FDA site (http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/newpetfoodrecalls/) has not updated since April 30th. I understand that updating can be a full time job but it is the FDA and people rely on this site for information. Wellness had a recall in May but if someone went to the site today, May 25th, they would never know it.

Here is the video:

 


Scientists Say Ginkgo May Improve Memory Functions

New research shows that the herb, ginkgo biloba, may improve human performance on tasks requiring short-term memory.

These findings are detailed in a study from Australian and British scientists.

The study participants were given a ginkgo extract for fourteen days and showed improvements in memory-related functions, according to the results.

These functions included working memory and specific brain electrical activity, say R.B. Silberstein and five other scientists in the published study.

Silberstein and colleagues add that the nineteen healthy men who consumed ginkgo biloba tablets showed greater memory task accuracy and different brain waves.

For the memory task, participants who took the herb were handed an irregular polygon-shaped object. Then scientists allowed some time to pass by projecting different shapes on a screen for them.

Afterwards, the volunteers were handed an irregular-shaped object and were asked whether this object was the same as the previous object.

The study shows that the men who consumed ginkgo were 5.1% more accurate on that memory test than men who took the test after consuming only a placebo.

The research also indicates that there were differences in brain wave activity between the ginkgo group and the placebo group.

According to the scientists, brain wave activity was measured with electrodes that were applied to the scalp of the volunteers, men who ranged in age from fifty- to sixty-one years old.

The scientists determined that the volunteers who consumed ginkgo biloba had brain waves with increased amplitude, or strength, in brain regions related to task performance and IQ.

So, this herb shows promise for people who are interested in supporting memory functions.

MemoRise™ supports brain health and memory functions for help with the common forgetfulness associated with aging.


Does Your Dog Or Cat Have Asthma?

Asthma is characterized by chronic problems with the respiratory system, and just like humans, cats and dogs are susceptible to asthma. It generally affects cats more frequently than dogs. Similarly to humans, asthma in pets can be triggered by environmental factors such as a change in season. It can be challenging to determine the exact cause of the asthma, but the most frequent culprits are grass, dust, pollen and smoke.

It can also be difficult to tell if your pet is actually suffering from asthma, as it is often misdiagnosed. For instance in cats, the coughing up of hairballs are often mistaken for asthma.While it may be difficult to find the triggers of the asthma, it will be well worth it. For cats, many times the dust from their litter can be the cause, or even the chemicals you use around the house. If you can reduce the amount of exposure your pet has to the allergen you can greatly increase the well-being of your pet.

Symptoms of asthma in pets can include:

  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Trouble breathing
  • Excessive panting (for dogs)
  • Blue coloration of gums or tongue
  • Weight loss

Pet asthma can be very troublesome for both you and your pet. But rest assured there are solutions, with a little time and effort you can have your pet feeling better in no time. If you think your pet may be suffering from asthma, make sure to visit your vet as soon as possible.

AmazaPet ™ Homeopathic remedy relieves wheezing and chest discomfort to maintain healthy respiratory functioning


Newest Scandal - Fake Pig Ears For Dogs From China

Police in China are investigating after the discovery of a batch of "fake" pigs' ears reportedly made from gelatin, according to state media.

In the latest food safety scare to hit the country, the bogus ears were discovered in a market in Ganzhou city in the eastern province of Jiangxi in late March after a customer complained of a strange smell when cooking them, the state-run China Daily newspaper reported.

Food safety officials tested the "ears" and found they had been made from gelatin and the chemical sodium oleate, commonly used in the production of soap.

China's government has repeatedly vowed to improve food safety as people grow increasingly alarmed about the quality of what they eat, but scandals still occur due to weak enforcement and unscrupulous business practices.

Photos circulating online showed local officials examining a box of the fake ears, which appeared light-brown in colour and to have a plastic-like texture.

The China Daily quoted an expert as offering a sure-fire method for telling real ears -- a popular delicacy -- from fake ones, saying the genuine article should have hair and small blood vessels.

The Jiangxi provincial health department could not be reached for comment on the latest case.

The investigation into the fake ears comes as authorities launched a probe into vegetable sellers in the eastern province of Shandong for spraying cabbages with the harmful chemical formaldehyde to keep them fresh.

Last year authorities arrested more than 30 people over the sale of cooking oil made from leftovers scooped out of gutters.

And in 2008, milk was at the centre of one of China's biggest food safety scandals when the industrial chemical melamine was found to have been illegally added to dairy products to give the appearance of higher protein content.

From: http://health.yahoo.net/news/s/afp/fake-pig-ears-latest-china-food-scandal-report

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Heat Stroke In Pets

Heat stroke can be a life-threatening issue for both humans and pets. As humans, we can shed layers of clothes to stay cool, but this is not the case for pets. Imagine not being able to shed an extra layer of clothes on a hot summer day.

Recognizing the signs of heat stroke in your pet is crucial. Dogs with short noses, heavy coats and heart or respiratory problems have a higher heat stroke risk. So, make sure to watch them with extra caution. Some pets are more suited for the heat, so it’s important to know what your pet is bred for and his or her limits.

Signs of heatstroke in pets can include:

  • Excessive panting
  • Disorientation
  • Vomiting
  • Dark or bright red tongue
  • Dry mouth
  • Body temperature from 104-110F
  • Coma

If you think your pet may have heat stroke, visit a vet immediately. Just because the symptoms go away, don’t assume your pet is fine. Its internal organs may still be suffering from heat stroke. This is why it is so important to keep an eye on your pet while out on a hot day.

Use the following tips to keep your pet cool on hot days:

  • Take your pet to a cool, shaded place.
  • Use cool, wet fabric to wrap around your pet’s feet and head.
  • Dump cool water on your pet. Don’t use ice water, as this may cause blood vessels to constrict.
  • Offer your ice cubes to lick and provide plenty water.

 

AmazaPet™ is a homeopathic remedy that relieves wheezing and chest discomfort to maintain easy breathing and respiratory functioning.


Cats Potentially At Risk After Diamond Pet Foods Dog Food Recall

Pet food recall from Diamond Pet Foods has been expanded eight times, triggered an FDA investigation and critique, and now includes cat food. The company's handling of the salmonella crisis may be even worse.

It's the food recall that just won't end.

From the recall of a single batch of its “Diamond Naturals” dry dog food on April 6 for possible salmonella contamination, Diamond Pet Foods has expanded the recall on eight separate occasions, endured a week-long inspection of one of its plants by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which criticized its practices, and most recently acknowledged that cats are also at risk.

Yet the Missouri-based maker of Diamond, Premium Edge, Kirkland Signature, and other pet food brands has not called special attention to the expansion of the recall to cat food beyond amending a statement on the company’s Internet recall site: “Diamond Pet Foods has voluntarily recalled some brands of dry dog and cat food that it manufactured in its Gaston, S.C. facility between December 9, 2011 and April 7, 2012 due to potential Salmonella contamination.”

There is no specific information on which brands and batches of cat food may be affected, though you can check a questionable bag's product code to find out.

On Friday morning, the Calgary Herald in Alberta, Canada, reported that two cats in a Montreal animal shelter have died, and another is ill, after eating Diamond Pet Foods products. Also in Quebec, another person has been reported with a case of salmonella, bringing the total number of cases to 16 in the United States and Canada caused apparently by handling the pet food.

Also on Friday, the company issued yet another recall involving certain sizes of its Diamond Naturals lamb and rice dog food manufactured on Aug. 26, 2011, which is later than the date range for all its other recalled products so far.

One of the unusual aspects of this recall is Diamond's release of information. On April 12, six days after Diamond's first recall, the FDA began an investigation. Its week-long inspection of Diamond's Gaston facility found numerous violations.

“All reasonable precautions are not taken to ensure that production procedures to not contribute contamination from any source,” its report said, noting that the factory’s screening process for possible contaminants wasn’t thorough enough.

Other violations: Factory workers were seen handling sensitive equipment with bare hands; there weren't enough hand-washing stations throughout the plant (even in areas where raw meat was being handled); the factory used damaged equipment with holes and cuts, which would make the tools difficult to clean properly.

Despite these findings, the company didn't issue a second recall until a week after the inspection was over, involving a single production run of its Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover's Soul brand. On April 30, it issued another expansion of the recall, this time involving puppy food. On May 3, the federal government announced it had linked 14 cases of salmonella in adults to Diamond's dog foods. On May 4, Natural Balance Pet Foods and WellPet LLC, makers of Wellness, announced a recall of their dog foods made at Diamond's plant. From there, the recalls kept coming.

“Diamond handled it the wrong way,” says Mike Sagman, creator and editor of dogfoodadviser.com, a consumer site that rates dog food products and follows pet-food industry news, including recalls. “The company knew more than they were letting out, and they let it dribble out over the month instead of releasing it all in one document. The damage is greater when you aren’t transparent.”

Recalls, he says, are unpredictable and largely unavoidable for large manufacturers in any industry. But they can be an opportunity for a company to shine, he adds, in terms of responding to a problem and coming clean with customers.

But “Diamond really blew it,” he says. “Their chance of survival from this is questionable, my common sense tells me.”

The company itself didn't return multiple calls to its media line. Its consumer hotline was answered promptly, but on two separate occasions its operators declined to provide any information once the caller identified herself as a reporter.

The FDA is also tight-lipped.

Article from: http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/2012/0520/Pet-food-recall-that-won-t-end-Diamond-cat-food-now-risky


Natural Hyperthyroidism Treatments For Cats

Cat-outdoorsHyperthyroidism occurs more commonly in cats than in dogs; and more specifically, it occurs in cats that are in the middle to senior years.

This endocrine disease creates an overproduction of the thyroxin hormone, which in turn, wreaks havoc on a cat's body. Hyperthyroidism is simply the thyroid not working at its optimal level and it can lead to a multitude of various health problems as it can affect nearly every organ and cell within a cat's body. With all of these different health problems, there are also many different symptoms too. This can make it hard for the veterinarian to diagnosis a case of Hyperthyroidism accurately. However, there are a few telltale signs and symptoms that are most commonly seen in Feline Hyperthyroidism. 

Signs To Watch Out For:
Experiencing diarrhea
Experiencing vomiting
Loss of weight
Being continually thirsty
Hyperactivity
Lethargy (often cats will experience lethargy right after being hyperactive)
Displaying anxiety and/or nervousness
Being irritable
Displaying Restlessness (Your cat may appear to be pacing around the room and may just not be able to settle down for any extended period of time)
Having a heart rate that is elevated (Your cat may have a heart rate that is faster than normal, and the beats may also be stronger than normal too)
Rapid breathing
Undergoing a change in the color and texture of the fur and coat (Some unlucky cats will develop an coat that continually looks disheveled and dull) 
Nails that are thicker than normal

If any of the above signs and symptoms are displayed in your cat, you will need to make an appointment to see your vet as soon as possible. Only a qualified veterinarian can accurately diagnose whether your cat's thyroid is creating too much thyroxin, leading to Hyperthyroidism. 

Causes of Hyperthyroidism in Cats 

We've already discussed that Hyperthyroidism is created by a cat's thyroid gland producing way more thyroxin hormone than it naturally needs. Although this overproduction is usually caused through a cat's natural aging process, in some cats a growth can appear on their thyroid glands that can be the main culprit in over-producing thyroxin, leading to Hyperthyroidism.  

Even though your cat will not die from Hyperthyroidism directly, being that it is an endocrine disease, it will diminish your cat's overall quality of life. Your cat's heart, kidneys and liver can all be affected by Hyperthyroidism. In addition, it can also cause a drastic weight loss and hypertension.

 There are a few scientific studies that conclude that cats that are given a diet consisting mostly of liver, giblet and fish flavored wet or canned cat food, are at a considerably higher risk for Hyperthyroidism.

There are only two distinct breeds of cats that are less inclined to developing Hyperthyroidism:  Himalayan cats and Siamese cats.  

Natural Treatment Choices 

After your vet has confirmed that your cat does indeed have Hyperthyroidism, he or she will create a treatment plan with your cat's specific needs in mind. Usually such a plan may include surgery, medication and possibly even radioactive iodine therapy. Be cautioned: such treatment can be quite costly! Plus, some of the medication that is prescribed these days can have adverse side effects in some cats, so you will need to monitor your cat's daily activities more closely than usual.

 In addition to your vet's treatment plan, you can also include more holistic and natural treatment options. These options are more inclined to help increase your cat's quality of life so that they can be happy, active and free of discomfort. An added plus, is that nearly every natural treatment solution does not contain any harmful side effects.  

Herbal remedies are the perfect holistic treatment alternative as they can give your cat a reprieve from the many different types of symptoms that Hyperthyroidism causes. In spite of this, you should always carefully read the labels of any homeopathic remedy intended to treat a cat's Hyperthyroidism prior to purchasing it. The perfect herbal remedy should include the following proven ingredients:

Gotu Kola - To naturally strengthen and boost your cat's immune system.

Bladderwack - A type of Sea Kelp that is excellent for managing your cat's overactive thyroid. Plus, since it is a seaweed, Bladderwack is a wonderful source of natural iodine.

Bugleweed -To help control your cat's thyroid-stimulating hormones, although it can also be used to help reduce your cat's irritability, restlessness and anxiety.

Hawthorn - To protecting your cat's cardiovascular functions by being a heart and vascular heart tonic.

Your cat can continue to live a happy and comfortable life, even with a Hyperthyroidism diagnosis, with the addition of holistic homeopathic treatments, a proper nutritional diet and good exercise.       


Related Products:
      Resthyro for Cat Hyperthyroidism


How Natural Is Your Diet? It May Be Linked to Chronic Pain

Does your kitchen contain more processed foods like sugar-laden sweets and salty chips than fresh, natural fruits, veggies, and whole grains? According to a New York Times report, Americans purchase 787 pounds of processed food versus 602 pounds of fresh food annually.

If you suffer from chronic pain, a poor diet may be partially to blame. New studies show worsened symptoms for certain conditions, including fibromyalgia, migraines, and arthritis, for participants who consumed a high amount of artificial flavorings, sweeteners, and other food additives.

In addition, processed foods offer much less nutritional value, increasing the glycemic index of carbohydrates. This in turn leads to higher spikes in blood sugar and insulin levels.

Cut out the additives

The following list includes a few common additives you should try and avoid or limit consumption of:

  • Artificial Sweeteners: Aspartame and other sugar substitutes, which are a common ingredient in diet soda, has been linked to fibromyalgia and migraines.
  • High-Fructose Corn Syrup: Studies have shown that some people have intolerance for this sweetener, often used in packaged foods, which can cause chronic abdominal pain and other digestive disorders.
  • MSG. This flavor-enhancer has been linked to chronic pain, as glutamate (a component of MSG), can destroy nerve endings when excessively consumed, according to Barbara Mendez, MS, RPh, a pharmacist and nutritional consultant in New York. Be cautious when reading labels, as this ingredient can also be named glutamic acid, yeast extract, hydrolyzed protein, sodium caseinate, and autolyzed yeast.
  • Preservatives. While chemicals keep food from spoiling, they can also cause harm to health. Baked goods are particularly high in preservatives, so try to opt for fresher alternatives, like swapping lettuce for bread slices, or baking your own.

 

InflammaGo™ Homeopathic remedy relieves joint and muscle pain, inflammation and stiffness associated with arthritis


More Troubles From The Diamond Pet Food Plant - This Time It's Missouri

As reported, last night there was another famous Friday night recall from Diamond - http://health4uandpets.typepad.com/healthproducts/2012/05/diamond-pet-food-expands-recall-again-to-include-diamond-naturals-small-breed-adult-dog-lamb-rice-fo.html

However, this time the food was made in the Meta, Missouri Diamond Plant. In early April Diamond started recalling dog and cat foods and that has continued through May. Now that the Meta, Missouri plant is involved will we start to see more recalls from that plant? Salmonella is not easy to get rid of so we're guessing yes.

Now here is the really scary part - the press release states - 'Product manufactured on August 26' but not packaged until 'September 27' and 'October 18'. What??? So the food was made 1 or 2 months before it was bagged? Where was it stored? How was it stored? How could this happen??

The Best Used Before date should coincide with the manufactured date but this food states - the 'Best Before' date on the package Is October 18, 2012 but the food was made on August 26 so that should be the date. Also, this is food FROM August 26, 2011 - it is May 19, 2012! That's 9 months after it's been made, 7 months since it's been bagged. This really blows me away that the food was sitting around 1 or 2 months before being bagged and was exposed to contaminants.

I am sure this isn't going to end well. Will Diamond just drag this out hoping consumers will forget? Look how many people are just hearing about the recalls in 2007 - will this be the same?

******If you are seeking a food that has NEVER been recalled please visit Life's Abundance. The food is formulated by a holistic vet and is shipped direct to you within 6 weeks of being made.

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How much does it cost to feed a 10lb dog? 30 cents a day on autoship! A 20lb dog? 45 to 50 cents a day on autoship (depending on the bag size). A 60lb dog? $1.10 per day on autoship! An 80lb dog? $1.30 a day on autoship! A 100lb dog? $1.50 on autoship!

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Diamond Pet Food Expands Recall Again To Include Diamond Naturals Small Breed Adult Dog Lamb & Rice Formula From Aug 2011

I recently read that 95% of people will continue feeding their pets the same food after it's been recalled. A very sad fact but I can see if it's one recall but Diamond has had pet food recalls since 2005 when they put up their recall site. It's getting a lot of traffic lately! Also it seems as though Diamond likes to do their recalls on Friday night, why?? Is this because they want people to forget over the weekend? It really is disgusting and I can't believe people are still trusting this brand after it has been repeatedly plagued with recalls. I have heard over and over - well it's not my state or it's not my flavor of food that has been recalled. Well here we have food from Aug 2011 and I'd like to ask "how much of this food has been fed?" however we also know that most commercial dog foods sit in warehouses for 6-12 months before ever hitting the store shelves. I am hoping this is the case - the food has been sitting in a warehouse uncontrolled for months so Diamond can now pull all the food and no other pets get sick. How many more foods will be recalled? How long will the next posted recall go back? These are questions you should be asking yourself when you say "well, it will be ok?" I'm sure your dog or cat appreciates that. One more thing - how did you like that the cat food recalls from Kirkland (Costco) weren't really publicized? That food got a blip in the recalls. What was the reasoning there? Hmmmm did the store that sells that brand have something to do with it? I'm thinking yes.

Diamond has expanded their recall (again) to include certain foods manufactured back in August, 2011.

Diamond Naturals Small Breed Adult Dog Lamb & Rice Formula samples, 6 pound and 18 pound bag sizes, manufactured on Aug. 26, 2011, have been added to the limited voluntary recall, due to potential exposure to Salmonella. No illnesses have been reported.

The product was distributed in the following states, further distribution through other pet food channels may have occurred:

· Colorado
· Illinois
· Kentucky
· Louisiana
· Michigan
· Minnesota
· Missouri
· Oklahoma
· Pennsylvania
· South Dakota
· Tennessee
· Texas
· Wisconsin

Production Code & Best Before Dates:

DSL0801, 26-Aug-2012
DSL0801, 26-Aug-2012
DSL0801, 27-Sept- 2012 (Product manufactured on Aug. 26, 2011 and packaged on Sept. 27, 2011)
DSL0801, 18-Oct- 2012 (Product manufactured on Aug. 26, 2011 and packaged on Oct. 18, 2011)
DSL0801, (Samples)

Pet owners who are unsure if the product they purchased is included in the recall, or who would like replacement product or a refund, may contact Diamond Pet Foods via a toll free call at 1-866-918-8756, Monday through Sunday, 8 am – 6pm EST.

Diamond Pet Foods apologizes for any issues this may have caused pet owners and their pets.


Chicken And Chicken Meal - What Are The Differences?

LifesabundancedogandcatfoodbannerMany consumers believe chicken is the better product and when they see chicken meal they don't realize that it is better. You have companies like Blue Buffalo that boast "Real Chicken" in their advertising and that makes people think that they need "Real Chicken" and when they see Chicken Meal they don't think it's "real."

I found this article from Dr. Ron Rompala and he does a great job of explaining this:

The recent problems with pet owners have encountered involving contaminated foods has many people paranoid. Pet owners want quality foods that will keep their pets healthy. Pet owners have become more concerned about the ingredients used to make pet foods. It is true that “garbage in means garbage out” so quality ingredients are essential for making good foods. Pet owners have become more aware of the variety of ingredients in pet food. However, there have been a number of misconceptions that have developed.

For example, chicken has been considered by many pet owners as superior ingredient to chicken meal. Is it?

Let’s differentiate between chicken and chicken meal. The definition for chicken, according to the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO), describes it as a clean combination of flesh and skin with or without accompanying bone, derived from parts of whole carcasses of chickens thereof, exclusive of feathers, heads, feet and entrails. Chicken meal, according to AAFCO, is the dry rendered product from a combination of clean flesh and skin with and without accompanying bone, derived from whole carcasses of chicken thereof, exclusive of feathers, heads, feet and entrails. Chicken essentially is taking a roaster and grinding it up, mixing everything together including muscle, skin and bones. The water content averages around 70%, along with 18% protein and 5% fat. Now take this ground chicken and carefully dry it to a moisture level of 10%. The protein content is now 65% and the fat level is 12%. This product is chicken meal.

Many pet owners feel that chicken is a superior ingredient to chicken meal. It would seem logical that feeding a pet a whole, non-rendered chicken would be good. It would give the owner the feeling that the pet is eating human food. However, these ingredients make up only part of the total food.

Let’s go through the manufacturing process for a pet food. Typically, all of the ingredients (meats, grains, vitamins, minerals) are all mixed together and run through a machine called an extruder. The extruder cooks the mixture by adding steam and water. The result is the familiar kibble coming out of the extruder and subsequently dried. Fat is added after drying. This is the same process for making many of the breakfast cereals. The final product has a moisture level of around 10% – far different than the 70% moisture of that chicken.

The processing of chicken along with the other ingredients essentially is converting it to chicken meal. However, there are some characteristics of chicken that makes it less flexible for use as an ingredient compared to chicken meal. The high moisture content of chicken limits the amount that can be formulated into a complete finished food. Chicken is generally stored frozen to minimize microbial growth. The frozen chicken is thawed and made into slurry before adding to the mix. On the other hand, chicken meal can be used in a finished food at levels much greater than chicken. In addition, the same quantity of chicken meal provides roughly 4-5 times the nutrients as the same weight of chicken because of the differences in moisture. For example, 100 lbs of chicken meal provides 65 lbs of protein while 100 lbs of chicken provides only 18 lbs of protein. So, a product with chicken as its first ingredient may only have 20% of this ingredient in the final product providing 3.6% protein. Chicken meal at 20% of the food provides 13% protein. The maximum inclusion of chicken meal into the final product can be significantly greater than for chicken.

Let’s assume a dog food (Product A) has a protein level of 28%. Chicken meal is the first ingredient comprising 25% of the food. Assume that Product B is 28% protein and has chicken as the first ingredient. Consequently, chicken meal would have to be added at the same amount as chicken in Product B to provide the same amount of protein from chicken sources to be equal to Product A. For example, Product A has 25% chicken meal which would be equal to Product B having 20% chicken and 20% chicken meal.

One product can have chicken meal as the first ingredient and another can have chicken. It is almost certain that the product with chicken meal makes a greater contribution to the total protein of the product than chicken. Both are providing the same profile of amino acids, the protein building blocks.

So, is there an advantage with chicken? Is it essentially the quality of the ingredient?

There are good suppliers of chicken that provide a good, clean product that does not have excessive bones or fat. In addition, a good supplier will keep chicken from spoiling and keep it free of pathogenic bacteria. Good suppliers of chicken meal will not dry this ingredient at excessively high temperatures which ruins valuable amino acids. A good food manufacturer will use only good ingredients from reliable suppliers. Consequently, the nutrients from chicken meal from a good supplier will be just as good as the nutrients from chicken. In addition, there is a significant cost difference between these two ingredients. Due to the challenges in handling, chicken may cost 50% more than chicken meal.

In summary, chicken and chicken meal are common ingredients in pet food. Pound for pound, chicken meal provides more nutrients than chicken at a lower cost. Pet food manufacturers need to find good suppliers to provide these ingredients and handle them properly to assure that the nutrients are not damaged. Pet owners must be educated to understand the true value of these ingredients and be able to make the best choice for their animals.

© Blue Seal Feeds – July, 2008

**********************************************

Life's Abundance uses the highest grade of Chicken Meal.We use the best cuts of meat (breast & thigh) and we eliminate the frozen water, skin, fat, cartilage,viscera, bone fragments, etc. Ask your company what kind of chicken meal they use. Remember that ingredients and labels don't tell the whole story.

 

 


Nestlé Purina Voluntarily Recalls Single Lot of Therapeutic Canned Cat Food Due to A Low Level of Thiamine (Vitamin B1)

Nestle Purina has recalled one lot of canned cat food due to low levels of thiamine.

Nestle Purina PetCare (NPP) is voluntarily recalling one specific lot of its Purina Veterinary Diets® OM Overweight Management canned cat food, available through veterinarians in the U.S. and Canada. This precautionary measure is being taken in response to one consumer complaint received by FDA. Analytical testing of the product sample by FDA indicated a low level of thiamine (Vitamin B1). Purina has received no other complaints of thiamine-related or any other health issues related to this product.

Only cans with the following “Best By” date and production code shown are included in this voluntary recall:

Purina Veterinary Diets® OM (Overweight Management) Feline Formula
Can size: 5.5 oz.
Best by date & production code: JUN 2013 11721159
Can UPC code: 38100 – 13810

*”Best By” Date and Production Code are found on the bottom of the can.

Cats fed this affected lot exclusively for several weeks may be at risk for developing a thiamine deficiency. Thiamine is essential for cats. Symptoms of deficiency displayed by an affected cat can be gastrointestinal or neurological in nature. Early signs of thiamine deficiency may include decreased appetite, salivation, vomiting and weight loss. In advanced cases, neurological signs can develop, which may include ventriflexion (bending towards the floor) of the neck, wobbly walking, falling, circling and seizures. Contact your veterinarian immediately if your cat is displaying any of these signs. If treated promptly, thiamine deficiency is typically reversible.

This product was distributed to veterinary clinics between June, 2011 and May, 2012 throughout the U.S. and Canada. The product is not sold in retail stores.

No additional Purina cat or dog products are involved in this voluntary recall. No other Purina Veterinary Diets® products are involved, and only Purina Veterinary Diets® OM canned cat food which match the “Best By” dates and production code above are included in this recall.

Consumers who have purchased Purina Veterinary Diets® OM canned cat food cans with these specific “Best By” Date and Production Codes should discontinue feeding the product, and discard it.

At Nestle Purina PetCare, the safety and efficacy of our products are our top priority. We apologize for any inconvenience due to this voluntary recall. For further information or to obtain a product refund, please contact Nestle Purina as follows:

U.S. Consumers & Veterinarians: Call toll-free 1-800-982-8837 Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Central Time, or visit www.purinaveterinarydiets.com .

Canadian Consumers & Veterinarians:Call toll-free 1-866-884-8387 Monday – Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time, or visit www.purina.ca.

For more information visit www.purinaveterinarydiets.com.


Two batches of Solid Gold Dog Food Recalled

ContaminatedfoodFrom: http://www.solidgoldhealth.com/news.php

Date: May 7, 2012

May 7, 2012
Just a few hours ago, Solid Gold received information that two batches of our foods were made at the Diamond Gaston plant around the same time period as some of the previously recalled foods of other brands. Though we have had zero complaints about these particular batches, we have decided to recall them as a precautionary measure. Due to the time difference between us and the appropriate FDA office, there was not enough time in the day to further discuss this voluntary recall with the FDA. We are announcing this now because we know our customers are concerned and didn't want an entire night to go by without this information being available to the public. Tomorrow morning (May 8th), after speaking with the FDA, Solid Gold will officially institute a voluntary recall of two batches of food made at the Diamond Gaston facility.

The following products will be part of this voluntary precautionary recall. Only the two foods with this particular best before date and batch code will be part of the recall.

Solid Gold WolfKing Large Breed Adult Food:
All sizes
Best before December 30, 2012
Batch code starting with SGL1201

Solid Gold WolfCub Large Breed Puppy Food
All Sizes
Best before December 30, 2012
Batch code starting with SGB1201

No other Solid Gold products are affected.
We greatly apologize for any concern and inconvenience this may cause and greatly thank you for your patience. Further information will be available in the official recall tomorrow morning. As always, please contact us at 800-364-4863 or dane@solidgoldhealth.com with any questions and we will respond as quickly as possible.

******If you are seeking a food that has NEVER been recalled please visit Life's Abundance. The food is formulated by a holistic vet and is shipped direct to you within 6 weeks of being made.

How much does it cost to feed a 7lb cat? Just 20 cents a day on autoship! How about a 12lb cat? 31 cents a day on autoship!

How much does it cost to feed a 10lb dog? 30 cents a day on autoship! A 20lb dog? 45 to 50 cents a day on autoship (depending on the bag size). A 60lb dog? $1.10 per day on autoship! An 80lb dog? $1.30 a day on autoship! A 100lb dog? $1.50 on autoship!

Purchase Life's Abundance Dog or Cat Food Now!


Apex Pet Foods Initiates Voluntary Recall of Dry Pet Food Due to the Potential for Salmonella

ContaminatedfoodContact:
Consumer:
866-918-8756

Media
816-255-1974

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 4, 2012 - Apex Pet Foods announced today that it is issuing a voluntary recall of all dry dog food formulas manufactured on January 24, 2012.

Although there have been no animal or human illnesses related to Apex Dog Food and the product has not tested positive for Salmonella, the company has voluntarily initiated this recall out of caution to ensure the health and safety of consumers and their pets.

The following products are being recalled

DescriptionSizeProduction CodeBest By Date
Apex Chicken and Rice Dog 40 lb. ACD0101B32 24-Jan-2013
Apex Chicken and Rice Dog 20 lb. ACD0101B32 24-Jan-2013

This product was only distributed in the State of South Carolina.

Apex Pet Foods apologizes for any potential issues this may have caused pet owners and their pets.

Pet owners who are unsure if the product they purchased is included in the recall, or who would like replacement product or a refund, may contact Apex Pet Foods via a toll free call at 1-866-918-8756, Monday through Sunday, 8 am – 6pm EST. The company is working with distributors and retailers to ensure all affected product is removed from shelves.

Pets with Salmonella infections may have decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. If left untreated, pets may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian. We do not have any confirmed reports of pet illnesses.

Individuals handling dry pet food can become infected with Salmonella, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with surfaces exposed to this product. Healthy people who believe they may have been exposed to Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. According to the Centers for Disease Control, people who are more likely to be affected by Salmonella include infants, children younger than 5 years old, organ transplant patients, people with HIV/AIDS and people receiving treatment for cancer.

******If you are seeking a food that has NEVER been recalled please visit Life's Abundance. The food is formulated by a holistic vet and is shipped direct to you within 6 weeks of being made.

How much does it cost to feed a 7lb cat? Just 20 cents a day on autoship! How about a 12lb cat? 31 cents a day on autoship!

How much does it cost to feed a 10lb dog? 30 cents a day on autoship! A 20lb dog? 45 to 50 cents a day on autoship (depending on the bag size). A 60lb dog? $1.10 per day on autoship! An 80lb dog? $1.30 a day on autoship! A 100lb dog? $1.50 on autoship!

Purchase Life's Abundance Dog or Cat Food Now!


Taste Of The Wild Pet Food Recall - Dry Pet Food

ContaminatedfoodFrom: http://www.tasteofthewildpetfood.com/information/

Here is the recall info from Taste of the Wild. It just states pet so please check both your dog and cat food bags until we know for sure.

Diamond Pet Foods, Manufacturer of Taste of the Wild Pet Food, Issues Voluntary Recall of Dry Pet Food
Recall is limited to product manufactured between December 9, 2011 through April 7, 2012 and distributed to 16 states and Canada

05/04/12

Diamond Pet Foods, manufacturer of Taste of the Wild Pet Food, has issued a voluntary recall of limited batches of their dry pet food formulas manufactured between December 9, 2011, and April 7, 2012 due to Salmonella concerns. Diamond Pet Foods apologizes for any potential issues this may have caused pet owners and their pets.

Although none of the products being recalled have tested positive for Salmonella, the company is pulling them from store shelves as a precaution. Diamond Pet Foods is coordinating efforts with federal and state health and regulatory agencies but decided to independently expand the recall to ensure the safety and well-being of customers and their pets.

To determine if your pet food is recalled, consumers should check the production codes on the back of bags. Any production codes that have a number “2” or a “3” in the 9th or 10th digit and an “X” in the 11th digit in the production code should be discarded. The best before dates are December 9, 2012, through April 7, 2013.

The recall affects only products distributed in the following U.S. states and Canada. Further distribution to other pet food channels may have occurred.

Alabama
Florida
Georgia
Indiana
Kentucky
Massachusetts
Maryland
Michigan
Mississippi
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Tennessee
Virginia
Canada

Pet owners who are unsure if the product they purchased is included in the recall, or who would like replacement product or a refund, may contact Diamond Pet Foods via a toll free call at 1-866-918-8756, Monday through Sunday, 8 am – 6pm EST. Consumers may also go to diamondpetrecall.com for more information. The company is working with distributors and retailers to ensure all affected product is removed from shelves.

Pets with Salmonella infections may have decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. If left untreated, pets may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian. We do not have any confirmed reports of pet illnesses.

Individuals handling dry pet food can become infected with Salmonella, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with surfaces exposed to this product. Healthy people who believe they may have been exposed to Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. According to the Centers for Disease Control, people who are more likely to be affected by Salmonella include infants, children younger than 5 years old, organ transplant patients, people with HIV/AIDS and people receiving treatment for cancer. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have received a limited number of reports of salmonellosis, the illness caused by Salmonella. We are working with the CDC, but due to patient confidentiality, we cannot comment further.

******If you are seeking a food that has NEVER been recalled please visit Life's Abundance. The food is formulated by a holistic vet and is shipped direct to you within 6 weeks of being made.

How much does it cost to feed a 7lb cat? Just 20 cents a day on autoship! How about a 12lb cat? 31 cents a day on autoship!

How much does it cost to feed a 10lb dog? 30 cents a day on autoship! A 20lb dog? 45 to 50 cents a day on autoship (depending on the bag size). A 60lb dog? $1.10 per day on autoship! An 80lb dog? $1.30 a day on autoship! A 100lb dog? $1.50 on autoship!

Purchase Life's Abundance Dog or Cat Food Now!


Canidae Dog Food Recall

ContaminatedfoodFrom: http://www.canidae.com/info/press-release.html

Canidae Pet Foods Initiates Voluntary Recall of Dry Pet Food
Due to the Potential for Salmonella
No pet or human illnesses have been reported associated with Canidae Pet Foods


Consumer Contact: 800-398-1600
Media Contact: Michael Lopes 800-398-1600 ext. 516, mlopes@canidae.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - May 4, 2012

Canidae Pet Foods announced today that it is issuing a voluntary recall of certain dry pet food formulas manufactured between December 9, 2011, and January 31, 2012 at the Diamond Pet Food Gaston, South Carolina plant.

Although there have been no animal or human illnesses related to Canidae Pet Food, and the product has not tested positive for Salmonella, the company has voluntarily initiated this recall out of caution to ensure the health and safety of consumers and their pets.

The below list of product with production codes that must have both a number “3” in the 9th or 10th digit and an “X” in the 11th digit with a best before dates of December 9, 2012, through January 31, 2013 which are being recalled.

The only Canidae products potentially affected are:

  • Canidae Dog, All Life Stages
  • Canidae Dog, Chicken Meal & Rice
  • Canidae Dog, Lamb Meal & Rice
  • Canidae Dog, Platinum

Following is an example of how to read the production code and best before date:

The recall affects only products distributed in the following Eastern U.S. states which were manufactured at the Diamond Pet Food Gaston, South Carolina plant. Further distribution to other pet food channels may occur:

Florida, Massachusetts, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee

Canidae Pet Foods apologizes for any potential issues this may have caused pet owners and their pets.

Pet owners who are unsure if the product they purchased is included in the recall, or who would like a replacement product or a refund, may contact Canidae Pet Foods via a toll free call at 1-800-398-1600, Monday through Friday, 9 am – 5 pm PST. Consumers may also go to canidae.com for more information. The company is working with distributors and retailers to ensure all products affected by this voluntary recall are removed from shelves.

As the products being recalled have the potential of Salmonella contamination, it is important to use care in handling them. Please carefully read all information below.

Pets with Salmonella infections may have decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. If left untreated, pets may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian. We do not have any confirmed reports of pet illnesses.

Individuals handling dry pet food can become infected with Salmonella, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands with soap and hot water, immediately after having contact with surfaces exposed to this product. Healthy people who believe they may have been exposed to Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. According to the Centers for Disease Control, people who are more likely to be affected by Salmonella include infants, children younger than 5 years old, organ transplant patients, people with HIV/AIDS and people receiving treatment for cancer.

******If you are seeking a food that has NEVER been recalled please visit Life's Abundance. The food is formulated by a holistic vet and is shipped direct to you within 6 weeks of being made.

How much does it cost to feed a 7lb cat? Just 20 cents a day on autoship! How about a 12lb cat? 31 cents a day on autoship!

How much does it cost to feed a 10lb dog? 30 cents a day on autoship! A 20lb dog? 45 to 50 cents a day on autoship (depending on the bag size). A 60lb dog? $1.10 per day on autoship! An 80lb dog? $1.30 a day on autoship! A 100lb dog? $1.50 on autoship!

Purchase Life's Abundance Dog or Cat Food Now!


Wellness Dog Food Announces Recall - Wellpet LLC Voluntarily Recalls One Recipe Of Dog Food

From: http://wellnesspetfood.com/news.aspx

WELLPET LLC VOLUNTARILY RECALLS ONE RECIPE
OF DRY DOG FOOD
DUE TO SALMONELLA AT DIAMOND PET FOODS’ FACILITY

 

Tewksbury, Mass. (May 4, 2012) – WellPet LLC announced a voluntary recall of one recipe of Wellness® dry dog food after being notified by Diamond Pet Foods regarding the presence of Salmonella in Diamond’s Gaston, South Carolina facility.

All Wellness products are tested for Salmonella and all lots tested negative prior to shipping to customers. The company is voluntarily recalling the select products below. This voluntary recall is being done out of an abundance of caution as these products were produced at the facility that has been linked to recent recalls of Diamond brand foods due to the threat of Salmonella.

Pets with Salmonella infections may have decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. If left untreated, pets may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Individuals handling dry pet food can become infected with Salmonella, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with surfaces exposed to this product. People who believe they may have been exposed to Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. According to the Centers for Disease Control, people who are more likely to be affected by Salmonella include infants, children younger than 5 years old, organ transplant patients, people with HIV/AIDS and people receiving treatment for cancer.

The products involved in this voluntary recall are:

Wellness Complete Health® Super5Mix® Large Breed Puppy, 15 lb. and 30 lb. bags and 5 oz. sample bags with best by dates of JAN 9 2013 through JAN 11 2013.

Best by dates (lot codes) can be found on the back of the bag in the bottom right-hand corner.

No other WellPet recipes, sizes or brands of food are impacted by this voluntary recall.

"As a pet parent myself, I know how important peace of mind is when it comes to the health of our pets, and that is why we require that all of our products undergo testing for Salmonella, among other things," said Tim Callahan, chief executive officer of WellPet, the maker of Wellness® products. "All of these lots tested negative prior to being released for sale. We are voluntarily taking this additional step to further safeguard our dogs and to put our customers’ minds at ease."

The majority of Wellness natural products for pets are produced in WellPet’s own modern state-of-the-art manufacturing facility in Mishawaka, Indiana. WellPet no longer purchases any products from Diamond Pet Foods.

Pet owners who are unsure if the product they purchased is included in the recall, would like replacement product or have additional questions, may call us at (877) 227-9587 (Monday – Friday, 8:00 AM through 6:00 PM Eastern time and Saturday and Sunday, 9:00 AM through 5:00 PM Eastern time).

******If you are seeking a food that has NEVER been recalled please visit Life's Abundance. The food is formulated by a holistic vet and is shipped direct to you within 6 weeks of being made.

How much does it cost to feed a 7lb cat? Just 20 cents a day on autoship! How about a 12lb cat? 31 cents a day on autoship!

How much does it cost to feed a 10lb dog? 30 cents a day on autoship! A 20lb dog? 45 to 50 cents a day on autoship (depending on the bag size). A 60lb dog? $1.10 per day on autoship! An 80lb dog? $1.30 a day on autoship! A 100lb dog? $1.50 on autoship!

Purchase Life's Abundance Dog or Cat Food Now!


Natural Balance Dog Food Recall

From: http://www.naturalbalanceinc.com/home/NB_recall.html

5/4/12

To Our NB Community:

Natural Balance has just been notified by Diamond Pet Foods, one of our co-manufacturers, that certain Natural Balance dry food formulas produced in their Gaston, SC facility should be voluntarily recalled.

Although there have been no animal illnesses reported and none of our Natural Balance products included in the recall have tested positive for Salmonella, we have voluntarily initiated this recall as a precautionary measure.

The following is a list of products affected, for select sizes:

Formula Best By Date
5 LB Natural Balance Sweet Potato & Venison Dog December 12, 2012; December 13, 2012; March 12, 2013
15 LB Natural Balance Sweet Potato & Venison Dog December 12, 2012; December 13, 2012; December 14, 2012; March 5, 2013; March 6, 2013
28 LB Natural Balance Sweet Potato & Venison Dog December 12, 2012; December 13, 2012; December 14, 2012; March 5, 2013; March 6, 2013; March 7, 2013; March 8, 2013; March 12, 2013
5 LB Natural Balance Lamb Meal & Brown Rice Dog December 10, 2012; December 21, 2012; December 22, 2012
15 LB Natural Balance Lamb Meal & Brown Rice Dog December 10, 2012; December 21, 2012; December 22, 2012
28 LB Natural Balance Lamb Meal & Brown Rice Dog December 10, 2012; December 21, 2012; December 22, 2012
5 LB Natural Balance Sweet Potato & Bison Dog December 17, 2012; December 18, 2012; December 28, 2012; December 29, 2012
15 LB Natural Balance Sweet Potato & Bison Dog December 9, 2012; December 17, 2012; December 18, 2012; December 28, 2012; December 29, 2012
28 LB Natural Balance Sweet Potato & Bison Dog December 9, 2012; December 17, 2012; December 18, 2012; December 28, 2012; December 29, 2012
5 LB Natural Balance Vegetarian Dog December 9, 2012
28 LB Natural Balance Lamb Meal & Brown Rice Dog Large Breed Bites December 12, 2012; December 20, 2012; December 21, 2012
5 LB Natural Balance Lamb Meal & Brown Rice Dog Small Breed Bites December 21, 2012
12.5 LB Natural Balance Lamb Meal & Brown Rice Dog Small Breed Bites December 21, 2012
   

Recalled products may have been distributed in the following states:

Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, DC, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Vermont, Wisconsin, West Virginia, Wyoming and Canada.

States that are NOT affected include:

Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Washington.

Pet owners who are unsure if the product they purchased is included in the recall, or who would like replacement product or a refund, may contact our Customer Service team at (800) 829-4493 or email info@naturalbalanceinc.com. We will continue to update you as more information becomes available.

Sincerely,

Your Natural Balance Family

 

******If you are seeking a food that has NEVER been recalled please visit Life's Abundance. The food is formulated by a holistic vet and is shipped direct to you within 6 weeks of being made.

How much does it cost to feed a 7lb cat? Just 20 cents a day on autoship! How about a 12lb cat? 31 cents a day on autoship!

How much does it cost to feed a 10lb dog? 30 cents a day on autoship! A 20lb dog? 45 to 50 cents a day on autoship (depending on the bag size). A 60lb dog? $1.10 per day on autoship! An 80lb dog? $1.30 a day on autoship! A 100lb dog? $1.50 on autoship!

Purchase Life's Abundance Dog or Cat Food Now!


Investigation of a Multi-state Outbreak of Salmonella Infantis Linked to Dry Dog Food

From the FDA - http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodSafety/CORENetwork/ucm302904.htm

Background

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been collaborating with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and state and local officials to investigate a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella Infantis infections. A total of 14 individuals infected with the outbreak strain have been reported from nine states. For complete details on the cases, go to CDC’s Multistate Outbreak of Human Salmonella Infantis Infections Linked to Dry Dog Food website1.

FDA became involved in early April when the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development reported detecting Salmonella from an intact package of Diamond Naturals Lamb and Rice Formula for Adult Dogs, collected during retail surveillance sampling. Diamond Pet Food was notified of the sampling results, and agreed to voluntarily recall this product on April 6, 2012. See Firm Recall Press Release: Diamond Pet Foods Voluntarily Recalls Limited Number of Dry Dog Food Bags Due to a Potential Health Risk2 for more information. At that time, there were no known dog illnesses reported.

An additional finding of Salmonella in a sample taken by the Ohio Department of Agriculture, from an opened bag of Diamond Brand Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover's Soul Adult Light Formula dry dog food collected from the home of an ill person, and an unopened bag of the product collected from a retail store led to a recall of that product on April 26, 2012. See Firm Recall Press Release: Diamond Pet Foods Expands Voluntary Recall of One Production Run of Dry Dog Food Due to a Potential Health Risk3 for more information.

A sample of Diamond Puppy Formula dry dog food collected by FDA during an inspection at the South Carolina production facility also yielded Salmonella Infantis, which led to a recall of that product on April 30, 2012. See Firm Recall Press Release: Diamond Pet Foods Expands Voluntary Recall to Include Diamond Puppy Formula due to Possible Salmonella Contamination4 for more information.

Public health officials used DNA “fingerprints” of Salmonella bacteria obtained through diagnostic testing with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, or PFGE, to investigate cases of human illness. CDC reports that this outbreak strain (Infantis) is rare, and typically only 0 to 3 cases are reported per month to PulseNet5.

Through interviews by state public health officials, FDA’s review of consumer complaints, and from a comparison of pet products from human exposure, some brands of dry pet food produced by Diamond Pets Foods at a single manufacturing facility in South Carolina have now been linked to human Salmonella infections.

FDA, CDC, and state investigations are ongoing in an effort to determine if other brands of dry dog food produced at the South Carolina facility may be linked to confirmed human illnesses. FDA will provide updates on the investigation as new information becomes available.

Recall Information

Complete information on the recalled products, including photos, lot numbers, and distribution information on each is located at Diamond Pet Foods Recall Information6 disclaimer icon.

Since their initial recall on April 6, 2012, Diamond Pet Foods has voluntarily expanded that recall to include three of their dry dog food products. Diamond Pet Foods is cooperating with FDA and with state and local public health and agricultural officials in this ongoing investigation.

The recalled products were distributed in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

The company is working directly with distributors and retailers that carry these products to remove them as quickly as possible from the marketplace.

Advice to Consumers

Consumers should check their homes for recalled dog food products. Do not feed recalled products to your pet and do not handle the pet food. Follow the tips listed at FDA’s Safe Handling Tips for Pet Foods and Treats7.

Pet owners who are unsure if the product they purchased is included in the recall, or who would like a replacement product or a refund, may contact Diamond Pet Foods at 800-442-0402, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. EST, Monday through Friday, or visit Diamond Pet Foods Recall Information8 disclaimer icon.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever, and abdominal pain. Well animals can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

People who think they might have become ill after contact with dry pet food or with an animal that has eaten recalled dry pet food should consult their health care provider. Infants, older adults and those with impaired immune systems are more likely than others to develop severe illness.

Veterinarians and consumers alike should report cases of animal illness associated with pet foods to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator9 in their state, or electronically through the Safety Reporting Portal10.


Diamond Expands Recall - Taste Of The Wild, Kirkland (Costco) DOG & CAT Food & More!

Batches of the brands manufactured between
December 9, 2011 and April 7, 2012 are affected

Consumer Contact: 866-918-8756
Media Contact: 816-255-1974

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 4, 2012

Diamond Pet Foods today announced that it is expanding a voluntary recall to include batches of nine brands of dry pet food formulas manufactured between December 9, 2011 and April 7, 2012 due to potential Salmonella contamination.

In April 2012, Diamond Pet Foods initiated three voluntary recalls of Diamond manufactured dry dog food. Although none of the additional products being recalled have tested positive for Salmonella, the company is pulling them from store shelves as a precaution. Diamond Pet Foods is coordinating efforts with federal and state health and regulatory agencies and decided to independently expand the recall to ensure the safety and well-being of customers and their pets.

The company stated: “We have taken corrective actions at our Gaston, S.C., facility and voluntarily expanded the recall out of concern for our customers and their pets.”

Brands included in the recall include:

* Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover’s Soul
* Country Value
* Diamond
* Diamond Naturals
* Premium Edge
* Professional
* 4Health
* Taste of the Wild

To determine if their pet food is recalled, consumers should check the production codes on the back of bags that have a number “2” or a “3” in the 9th or 10th digit and an “X” in the 11th digit. The best-before dates for the recalled brands listed above are December 9, 2012 through April 7, 2013.

The following graphic illustrates how to read the production code and best-before date:

The recall affects only products distributed in the following U.S. states and Canada. Further distribution through other pet food channels may have occurred.

* Alabama
* Florida
* Georgia
* Indiana
* Kentucky
* Massachusetts
* Maryland
* Michigan
* Mississippi
* New York
* North Carolina
* Ohio
* Pennsylvania
* South Carolina
* Tennessee
* Virginia
* Canada

The Kirkland Signature products included in the recall include:

* Kirkland Signature Super Premium Adult Dog Lamb, Rice & Vegetable Formula (Best Before December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)
* Kirkland Signature Super Premium Adult Dog Chicken, Rice & Vegetable Formula (Best Before December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)
* Kirkland Signature Super Premium Mature Dog Chicken, Rice & Egg Formula (Best Before December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)
* Kirkland Signature Super Premium Healthy Weight Dog Formulated with Chicken & Vegetables (Best Before December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)
* Kirkland Signature Super Premium Maintenance Cat Chicken & Rice Formula (Best Before December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)
* Kirkland Signature Super Premium Healthy Weight Cat Formula (December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)
* Kirkland Signature Nature’s Domain Salmon Meal & Sweet Potato Formula for Dogs (December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013)

To determine if their pet food is recalled, consumers should check the production codes on the back of bags must have both a number “3” in the 10th digit and an “X” in the 11th digit. The best-before dates for the recalled brands listed are December 9, 2012 through January 31, 2013.

The following illustrates how to read the production code and best-before date:

The recall affects only products distributed in the following U.S. states, Puerto Rico and Canada.

* Alabama
* Connecticut
* Delaware
* Florida
* Georgia
* Maryland
* Massachusetts
* New Hampshire
* New Jersey
* New York
* North Carolina
* Pennsylvania
* South Carolina
* Tennessee
* Vermont
* Virginia
* Canada
* Puerto Rico

Diamond Pet Foods apologizes for any issues this may cause consumers and their pets. Pet owners who are unsure if the product they purchased is included in the recall, or who would like replacement product or a refund, may contact Diamond Pet Foods via a toll free call at 1-866-918-8756, Monday through Sunday, 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. EST. Consumers may also go to a special website, www.diamondpetrecall.com, for more information. The company is working with distributors and retailers to ensure all affected product is removed from shelves.

Pets with Salmonella infections may have decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. If left untreated, pets may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Individuals handling dry pet food can become infected with Salmonella, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with surfaces exposed to this product. People who believe they may have been exposed to Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. According to the Centers for Disease Control, people who are more likely to be affected by Salmonella include infants, children younger than 5 years old, organ transplant patients, people with HIV/AIDS and people receiving treatment for cancer. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have received a limited number of reports of salmonellosis, the illness caused by Salmonella. We are working with the CDC, but due to patient confidentiality, we cannot comment further.

Source: http://diamondpetrecall.com/diamond-expands-voluntary-recall/

Contaminatedfood

******* I have been saying this from the beginning! When Diamond just recalled a small amount of food and then shut down their plant. How dare they wait a month before recalling everything.

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